Deutsche Messe expands CeMAT portfolio

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CeMAT SOUTHEAST ASIA debuts in Indonesia in February 2017
Parallel events TransAsia Jakarta and ColdChain Indonesia

Deutsche Messe and international trade fair company ITE Group are co-organizing the premier of CeMAT SOUTHEAST ASIA from 28 February to 3 March 2017. CeMAT SOUTHEAST ASIA runs parallel to TransAsia Jakarta and ColdChain Indonesia at the Indonesia Convention Exhibition Center (ICE) in Jakarta. ICE is operated by Deutsche Messe and comprises 10 exhibition halls on 50,000 square meters, a 50,000-square-meter open-air site, a 4,000-square-meter convention hall, and a 12,000-square-meter pre-function lobby.

“With ICE, Deutsche Messe operates Southeast Asia’s biggest and most modern exhibition facility. Over the years, the region has developed into one of the world’s most important logistics hubs and offers outstanding business opportunities to logistics companies,” said Dr. Andreas Gruchow, member of the managing board at Deutsche Messe. “CeMAT SOUTHEAST ASIA marks a continuation of our international expansion program and also the first time that we have staged a CeMAT event parallel to additional logistics fairs. Together with TransAsia Jakarta and ColdChain Indonesia we showcase the entire logistics value chain.”

ceMAT preview 2014

 

CeMAT SOUTHEAST ASIA, TransAsia and Cold Chain Indonesia are expected to attract more than 200 exhibitors on 5,000 square meters of display area. The exhibit program features industrial trucks, complete logistics systems, rack and warehousing systems, cranes and lifting equipment, access platforms, auto ID systems, robotic logistics solutions, and packaging technology as well as logistics services such as freight forwarding, terminal operation, transport infrastructure, transport vehicles, and CEP services. Visitors will come from all over Southeast Asia.

Deutsche Messe organizes CeMAT SOUTHEAST ASIA, TransAsia Jakarta and ColdChain Indonesia in partnership with the UK-based trade fair company ITE. “We already collaborate with ITE on CeMAT RUSSIA, which works well, and we are delighted to now extend our partnership to Indonesia,” said Gruchow.

Laurent Noel, Industry Director Transport & Logistics of ITE Group Plc: “I am very excited to bring together the international expertise of two world-leading trade show organizers – ITE in the transport logistics sector and Deutsche Messe in the materials handling and intralogistics sectors. The three fairs we are co-staging in Jakarta will provide an outstanding business platform for the entire logistics industry in Southeast Asia. And the timing couldn’t be better, considering that in 2017 the Indonesian government will be completing the first of its new infrastructure projects in Java, Sumatra and Borneo, which will provide a major boost to the local economy.”

CeMAT SOUTHEAST ASIA will be supported by Indonesia’s leading business and government organizations – the Ministry of Trade, the Ministry of Transportation, the Ministry of Public Works and Housing, and APINDO (The Employers Association of Indonesia) – as well as the European Federation of Materials Handling (FEM) and the German Engineering Federation (VDMA).

“The CeMAT network has just added an important location for all of Southeast Asia. For Germany this region is very exciting even though China dominates the market. CeMAT SOUTHEAST ASIA is a good opportunity to get a foot in the door,” said Sascha Schmel, general manager of the VDMA’s materials handling and intralogistics division.

“ASEAN proves that a single, integrated regional market positively impacts trade performance. Logistics play a crucial role in this free flow of goods and services. CeMAT SOUTHEAST ASIA, TransAsia Jakarta and ColdChain Indonesia provide a platform where Southeast Asia’s logistics industry can evaluate trends, network and conduct business,” said M. Basuki Hadimuljono, Indonesia’s Minister for Public Works and Housing.

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First Compliance Verification Process for Ethernet ECUs

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RUETZ SYSTEM SOLUTION Performs Implementation of OPEN ALLIANCE TC8 Test Specification

RUETZ SYSTEM SOLUTIONS – experts in automotive data communication – provides the first compliance verification process for Ethernet ECUs accomplishing the OPEN ALLIANCE TC8 Test Specification. ”With IP/Ethernet technology in cars moving closer to realization, excellent quality and cost effectiveness of all components is mandatory,” stated Wolfgang Malek, General Manager and Co-Founder of RUETZ SYSTEM SOLUTIONS. ”The system specifications of whole board nets underlie enormous changes. Thus, Tier 1 and Tier 2 suppliers have to do their best to implement these new requirements reliably and right on time.” Through the compliance verification process, RUETZ SYSTEM SOLUTIONS introduces standardized test methods in order to bring new automotive standards together with reliable and stable systems. The compliance verification process provides an ecosystem for component and ECU verification and consequently simplifies the technology entry for new OEMs and suppliers.

RUETZ SYSTEM SOLUTIONS provides the first compliance verification process for Ethernet ECUs

Compliance Verification for Ethernet ECUs

RUETZ SYSTEM SOLUTIONS has completed several milestones for compliance verification. Following the release of the first OPEN ALLIANCE TC8 test specification, the experts in automotive data communication have put into effect a complete test process over all OSI/ISO layers. All test setups are available and the test process is in practice. The first project has successfully integrated the test process into an OEM’s onboard system development: at their compliance test lab, RUETZ SYSTEM SOLUTIONS has effectively tested Tier 1 devices (ECUs) and Tier 2 components (FPGAs, ASICs).

Automotive Ethernet Test Scopes

RUETZ SYSTEM SOLUTIONS provides compliance testing for automotive IP/Ethernet covering all relevant test scopes. Tests for layer 1 (PHY) include interoperability tests and PMA. For layer 2 (MAC) testing, the experts in data communications supply VLAN testing, QoS testing, general switch testing, ingress filtering, and diagnostics. The TCP/IP protocol family incorporates the following protocols: Address Resolution Protocol (ARP), Internet Control Message Protocol version 4 (ICMPv4), Internet Protocol version 4 (IPv4), Dynamic configuration of IPv4 Link Local Address, User Datagram Protocol (UDP), Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol version 4 (DHCPv4), and Transmission Control Protocol (TCP). For automotive protocols, SOME/IP and SOME/IP SD are part of the test portfolio.

New President at Mesago

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As of February 1, 2016, Dipl.-Ing. Martin Roschkowski (50) joins the Board of Management of Mesago Messe Frankfurt GmbH and its subsidiaries Mesago Messemanagement GmbH and Mesago PCIM GmbH. Continuing the proven success of dual leadership at the company, he will lead together with co-president Petra Haarburger. Martin Roschkowski takes over the reins from Johann Thoma, who will be taking up his new role at the Messe Frankfurt headquarters as of May 2016, after nine years at the head of Mesago.

Martin Roschkowski (50) joins the Board of Management of Mesago Messe Frankfurt GmbH

In Martin Roschkowski, Mesago is gaining an experienced manager. For the last ten years, he has held the role of Managing Director at Xylem Water Solutions Deutschland GmbH. Before that, the qualified electrical engineer served as a head of department for a number of years at Weidmüller Interface, where he was responsible for strategic marketing worldwide. Given his technological background and many years of sales experience, he is the perfect choice for Mesago Messe Frankfurt GmbH, an active player in the area of technology events.

“I would like to start by thanking my predecessor, Johann Thoma. Together with Petra Haarburger, he has really made his mark on Mesago in recent years and has helped make the company what it is today. I consciously opted for Mesago for the same reason. I also wanted to contribute to shaping the company and continuing its success, in close collaboration with our customers, partners, and employees,” explains Martin Roschkowski.

Mass-produced underwater vehicles

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There has never been so much human activity in the depths of the oceans. Several thousand meters below the surface, oil companies are prospecting for new deposits and deep-sea mining companies are looking for valuable mineral resources. Then there are the thousands of kilometers of pipelines and submarine cables that need regular maintenance. Not to mention the marine scientists who would like to be able to use robust devices to survey large areas of the ocean floor. All these applications mean there is a growing demand for underwater exploration vehicles.

To meet this demand, researchers at the Fraunhofer Institute for Optronics, System Technologies and Image Exploitation IOSB in Ilmenau and Karlsruhe have designed a powerful autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) capable of being manufactured in large numbers. Companies have been using AUVs for many years in deep-sea exploration missions. These untethered vehicles glide independently through the water collecting observation data, and make their own way back to the research vessel. Up to now, these have primarily been custom-built and very expensive. They have complicated structures, which makes them relatively difficult to handle by the crew on board the research vessel; for instance, accessing the batteries in order to replace them. It takes one hour to read the many terabytes of observation data out of the AUV’s onboard processor. What’s more, many of these vehicles are so heavy that only specially trained operators can place them in the water using the ship’s winch.

Mass-produced underwater vehicles

CAN bus system prevents cable spaghetti

The IOSB’s AUV overcomes all of these problems and will be on display at the Oceanology International exhibition (Booth H600) in London from March 15 to 17, 2016. The vehicle called DEDAVE (Deep Diving AUV for Exploration) bears a certain resemblance to the space shuttle. The research team, led by project manager Professor Thomas Rauschenbach, has fitted it out with technologies not normally found in AUVs to date. To avoid the typical mess of cables, which was often a source of faults, they installed a CAN bus system like those found in every modern car. It consists of a slim cable to which all control devices and electric motors can be connected. “Many experts who visit our laboratory are amazed how neat and tidy DEDAVE looks on the inside,” says Rauschenbach. The advantage of having so few cables and connectors is that faults are avoided. New modules, sensors or test devices can also be connected quickly and easily to the standardized CAN bus. Batteries and data storage devices are held in place by a tough but simple latch mechanism, allowing them to be removed with a minimum of effort. There is no longer any need to download data from the processor.

Room for four AUVs in one shipping container

One of the strengths of the lightweight, 3.5-meter-long underwater vehicle is that it takes up very little space. Aboard a ship, AUVs are stored in standard shipping containers, which usually offer only enough room for one vehicle. “We, one the other hand, can fit four AUVs into the same container,” says Rauschenbach. “The advantage of having four vehicles available is that larger than usual areas of ocean can be surveyed in far less time.” Despite their small size, the AUVs still provide plenty of additional carrying space. The payload bay measures approximately one meter in length, which is sufficient for installing several different sensors for capturing ocean floor survey data.

The underwater vehicle is powered by eight batteries, each weighing 15 kilograms. A fast-release latch mechanism enables them to be removed and replaced with little effort. A fully charged battery holds enough power for up to 20 hours’ travel. The software for the sophisticated battery management system was specially developed by researchers at the Fraunhofer Institute for Silicon Technology ISIT in Itzehoe. In collaboration with the GEOMAR Helmholtz Center for Ocean Research, Kiel, and a Spanish research center, DEDAVE will go through deep sea testing off the coast of Gran Canaria in the coming weeks.

Prof. Dr. Thomas Rauschenbach:

“The underwater vehicle has already passed numerous different tests. Before it goes into production, it will now undergo several weeks of deep-sea testing off the coast of Gran Canaria.”

Underwater vehicle goes into series production

DEDAVE is the world’s first autonomous underwater vehicle to be developed from the outset with a view to series production. It will be manufactured by a company to be specifically created for this purpose as a spin-off from the IOSB in the first half of 2016. The series production of a product of this type requires that every single manufacturing step is documented in detail. This is the only means of ensuring that the trained workers can build the vehicles as on an assembly line. For this part of the project, specialists from the auto industry have been engaged to contribute their expertise in industrial manufacturing and the qualification of subcontractors.

Further information: http://www.dedave.de

[#HM2016] Adjusting production processes in real time

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Industry 4.0 requires comprehensive data collection in order to control highly automated process sequences in complex production environments. One example is the cultivation of living cells. But digitalizing and networking biotech production equipment is a huge challenge: relevant standards have yet to be established, and biology has a dynamic all its own. Using fully automated equipment for producing stem cells, Fraunhofer researchers have managed to adjust the process control to cell growth – delivering an adaptive system that is suitable for use in a number of sectors.

Fraunhofer-Gesellschaft Industry 4.0

The term industry 4.0 is generally associated with the manufacturing of cars, machinery or industrial goods. But, as the partners (see box) in the StemCellFactory collaborative project show, the comprehensive networking of machines and products is also making headway in biotechnology. This is a particular challenge, because this field deals not with solid components but with living objects that – unlike screws or gears – change and multiply. Networked process control needs to take this into account and be able to adjust the process accordingly in real time.

The StemCellFactory project partners have set up a fully automated production line for culturing stem cells, which can develop into any kind of cell found in the body; experts call them induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS cells). Researchers from the Fraunhofer Institute for Production Technology IPT will be presenting the production line at the Hannover Messe Preview on January 27 and at the Hannover Messe (Hall 17, Booth C18 and Hall 2, Booth C16) from April 25 to 29. Medical expertise was provided by experts from the university clinics in Bonn and Aachen, among others. iPS cells such as these are necessary in the development of medications used in personalized medicine. They are obtained from adult body cells such as human skin or blood cells. First, a doctor takes cells from a patient. Next, these cells are reprogrammed to become iPS cells by adding certain substances. This causes the cells to revert to an embryonic state, from which they can theoretically differentiate into any cell type – even heart or nerve cells, which, owing to the risk to the patient, cannot be obtained by means of a biopsy. The pharmaceutical industry uses these cells for medical tests: since they contain the patient’s own genetic information, the cells are very useful for determining which medications will be effective.

Fully automated, modular production platform

To date, iPS cells are grown by lab specialists in a painstaking, time-consuming process. The number and quality of iPS cells that can be cultured depend entirely on how experienced the lab technician is. This is why the project aimed to develop fully automated, modular equipment that achieves both a high throughput and a consistently high quality of stem cells. The IPT experts were given the task of developing both the equipment and its control mechanisms. They faced a number of challenges, the first being how to network the various biotech devices – liquid handling robot, a microscope, an incubator, and the automatic magazine for storing cells and containers – in a way that permitted the use of process-control technology in the first place. “Despite the industry’s efforts to establish uniform interfaces for lab automation equipment, there is as yet no international standard for networking the devices used,” says IPT developer Michael Kulik. “That means plug and play is not an option, so we first had to develop a standard of our own before we could integrate everything.”

This approach achieved a very high degree of networking in order to allow the process-control technology and the lab equipment to exchange information. That in turn was the prerequisite for the equipment to adjust extremely flexibly to the biological processes at work. Cell growth is the decisive factor. As the cells grow in the cell culture vessels, they divide again and again. To ensure conditions don’t get too cramped for the cells, from time to time the pipette feeder robot has to distribute them among a larger number of fresh, empty cell culture vessels.

To this end, the microscope developed at the IPT regularly examines the growth density inside the cell culture vessels. Once a critical density is reached, the microscope sends out an instruction to rehouse the cells. “This is an example of the product, in this case the growing stem cells, determining how the overall process unfolds,” says Kulik. In other words: production has the capability to adjust itself to the present situation.

A user interface makes it easy to control each device included in the equipment. If the user needs to alter or add to the equipment’s process steps, there are pre-programmed blocks of instructions that they can simply drag into or out of the control menu. Staff can choose whether to operate the equipment in fully automated or manual mode.

The technology developed as part of the StemCellFactory project can also be applied in other situations, for instance in tissue engineering and the production of tissue models. It would also be possible to use it to manufacture gears, screws, engines, etc. in a fully automated way. The software is scalable, making it suitable for small and large production facilities alike. Since the programming is extremely flexible, the process-control technology can be transferred to any other production setup in need of adaptive control on the basis of current measurement data. During the Hannover Messe, visitors will be treated to a live demonstration of how the StemCellFactory is controlled remotely, specifically from Bonn.

The following are partners on the StemCellFactory project:

• Fraunhofer Institute for Production Technology IPT

• University Clinic Bonn

• Uniklinik RWTH Aachen

• HiTec Zang GmbH

• LIFE & BRAIN GmbH

• Max Planck Institute for Molecular Biomedicine

Further information: http://www.stemcellfactory.de

[#CeBIT 2016] Medical monitor with eyes and ears

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In intensive care Units (ICU), every second counts. In emergencies, doctors and nurses need to make the right decisions quickly. Fraunhofer researchers have developed a smart „proxemic monitor“ which has optimized the processes in the most sensitive area of a hospital and clearly shows the data of the connected medical devices while avoiding false alarms. The screen can be controlled from a distance, without contact, by means of gestures and voice commands, thereby reducing the risk of transmitting pathogens.

CeBIT 2016 - smart proxemic monitor

Everything had just been quiet in the control room of the intensive care unit. Suddenly, though, there is excitement: the alarms on several medical devices in different rooms are sounding. Monitors are flashing and beeping. A drop in blood pressure, cardiac arrhythmia – the computer monitors show exactly what has to be done and where. Doctors and nurses rush to the rooms of the patients. Medical equipment there provides detailed information on the status of the critically ill patients. „It‘s not easy to keep track of everything here during hectic situations”, says Paul Chojecki, scientist from the „Vision & Imaging Technology” Department at the Fraunhofer Institute for Telecommunications, Heinrich-Hertz-Institut, HHI, in Berlin.

Controlled by contact-free gestures

Together with his team as part of the joint project „control room”, the scientist has developed an intelligent monitor. It quickly shows doctors and nurses the most important information about the vital signs of their intensive care patients. The screen has interfaces to the medical equipment in the room, as well as with the information systems in the hospital, and can be controlled by contact-free gestures and voice commands. The graphics of its display adapt to the distance from which it is viewed. „From the door, the doctor sees the data in a correspondingly large size. As he gets closer, the screen displays detailed information”, Chojecki explains. A 3D camera provides the necessary data. The user interface is programmed based upon the web, so it is also suitable for mobile devices, such as tablets. The scientists are presenting a demonstration of the „proxemic monitor” at CeBIT 2016 (Hall 6, Stand B36). A practical test in cooperation with Uniklinik RWTH Aachen is planned for later this year.

The system evaluates the data of the medical devices on the basis of the smart alarm design of the project partner, the Medical Engineering Department of Aachen University Hospital. This prevents false alarms. „Intensive care doctors have told us that this is a big problem. Current devices stick stubbornly to determined limits, without including all of the relevant factors that are necessary in order to comprehensively assess the risk situation. In addition, the acoustic signals produce a very loud noise, which is not beneficial to the health of either the staff or the patient”, Chojecki says.

Less pathogens transmitted

Another advantage of the gesture control is that the doctor or health care provider does not have to touch the devices directly. „The transfer of pathogens in hospitals, particularly in intensive care units, is still a problem. The obligatory hand hygiene is sometimes forgotten, and viruses as well as bacteria are carried from room to room”, Chojecki describes. The smart screen can be programmed at the bedside, as well as used in the control room (with a different configuration). Chojecki adds: „That‘s an important distinction, since it is not legally permitted for all of the instrument functions in the patients‘ rooms to be accessed from the control room. It has to be ensured that the doctor actually examines the patient before changing the treatment”.

Three different cameras and a microphone scan the area in front of the monitor. Using the video data, the built-in software of the HHI analyzes whether there are people in the room, how far away they are from the screen, and what movements they are making. Depending on the distance, the display and functionality of the monitor changes. „Our monitor distinguishes between near, medium, and further distance. The cameras cover a maximum distance of four meters”, Chojecki explains. From the medium distance, the cursor can be controlled with arm movements, and commands or short reports can be input by voice. With pre-programmed gestures, for example, a video call can be started, in order to have discussions with other physicians within or outside of the hospital. „We have given the monitor eyes and ears so as to allow for multi-modal interaction between the user and the system. Our software records distances and movements of the user in a contactless manner, interprets them, and converts them into commands for operating systems or machines”, Chojecki explains.

[People] Industry 4.0 requires intelligent integration

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Dr. Steffen Haack, member of the executive board responsible for the Industrial Applications business unit and coordinating the sales organization of Bosch Rexroth AG

Industry 4.0 will not only trigger innovations in production technologies – the automation industry itself will also undergo fundamental changes. But at the same time, it will be difficult for many players in the automation industry to part with approaches to which they have become accustomed. Again and again, I encounter the wishful thinking from those with whom I speak, proposing to “go it alone” in Industry 4.0, being the first, staying ahead. On the other hand, there are areas into which news about the exciting potential of Industry 4.0 has not yet reached.

Dr. Steffen Haack, Bosch Rexroth

Here, Bosch Rexroth has taken a decidedly different course. Together with partners from the world of IT, we are systematically sounding out the potential of Industry 4.0 and broadening our experience with a variety of small steps. This in turn influences new drive and control solutions, especially in the development of interfaces with the IT world.

From our perspective – and we hope, that of the broader automation industry, much of the path forward has already been successfully laid: For Industry 4.0, Bosch Rexroth offers a comprehensive portfolio of intelligent and open solutions, from intelligent drive technology and highly functional and high-performance control technology, all the way to a wide software portfolio for engineering.

But if many automation tasks have already been accomplished, why is Industry 4.0 implementation lagging so far behind in factories and production halls? The answer: The gap between the worlds of Industry and IT is not yet closed. In order to speed up implementation in this area, Bosch Rexroth is collaborating with numerous companies from the world of IT. In many cases, the aim is to link existing knowledge with available solutions based on open IT standards.

At the Bosch Rexroth trade fair booth, Dassault Systèmes, MathWorks, National Instruments, and Oracle IT companies, as well as the Eclipse Foundation, are presenting just such connections for PLC IPC drives. Thanks to Rexroth Open Core Engineering, they are connecting their solutions through various tools, languages, and platforms, using Bosch Rexroth’s automation portfolio to form a homogeneous, comprehensive solution. In the process, these partners are able to transfer their knowledge and expertise to the machine world in terms of simulation, process, and company software. It demonstrates how machine manufacturers enable this evolutionary bridge building between PLC automation and IT-based solutions as collaboration proceeds, leveraging the value of intelligent integration to make Industry 4.0 a working reality for the world of automation.